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dc.contributor.author Cherry, Bennett
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-16T17:30:19Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-16T17:30:19Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Bennett Cherry (2015). "Side Effects of Rivalries: Are Fans Less Likely to Help Rivals in Need?" Presented at the Academy of Marketing Science Proceedings 2015 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/213882
dc.description.abstract The passion that many sports fans have for their favorite teams can be beneficial to sports teams (by increasing ticket sales and sales of licensed merchandise; Bristow and Sebastian, 2001; Fisher and Wakefield, 1998), media companies (by increasing ratings) and sponsoring companies (by creating favorable attitudes and purchase intentions; Bee and Dalakas, 2014; Madrigal, 2000). In addition, there are several positive outcomes for the fans’ well-being like self-esteem, social well-being, experiencing positive emotions, and lower likelihood to feel lonely (Branscombe and Wann, 1991; Wann, 1994; Wann, 2006). However, such passion may also have a dark side that research should consider (Madrigal and Dalakas, 2008). Specifically, sports fans often exhibit aggressive behaviors, verbal and/or physical, especially in targeting rivals. This study examines a different angle of morally questionable behavior by fans regarding perceptions and behaviors that dehumanize rivals, namely propensity to help people in need. Therefore, it provides an interesting insight into fan psychology and behavior and sports rivalries. Presentation by Bennett Cherry at Academy of Marketing Science Conference, Denver, Colorado, May 12-14 en_US
dc.format.extent 4 en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Academy of Marketing Science en_US
dc.subject Sports en_US
dc.subject Rivalry en_US
dc.subject Fans en_US
dc.title Side effects of rivalries: Are fans less likely to help rivals in need? en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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